Daily Archives: April 19, 2007

The Supreme Court thinks Congress knows more about women’s health than does the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists

And: Why I continue to be grateful for the lessons I learn from my mother

My mother, from whom I learned so much about social justice, freedom of thought, women’s potential, and the need to stand up for those who can’t stand up for themselves, sent the following news release from the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. (The addition of bold and italic styles are mine, just for emphasis.)

ACOG NEWS RELEASE

For Release: April 18, 2007
Contact: ACOG Office of Communications
  (202) 484-3321
  communications@acog.org

ACOG Statement on the US Supreme Court Decision Upholding the
Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003

Washington, DCDespite the fact that the safety advantages of intact dilatation and evacuation (intact D&E) procedures are widely recognized—in medical texts, peer-reviewed studies, clinical practice, and in mainstream, medical care in the United States—the US Supreme Court today upheld the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003.

According to the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ (ACOG) amicus brief opposing the Ban, the Act will chill doctors from providing a wide range of procedures used to perform induced abortions or to treat cases of miscarriage and will gravely endanger the health of women in this country.

“Today’s decision to uphold the Partial-Birth Abortion Ban Act of 2003 is shameful and incomprehensible to those of us who have dedicated our lives to caring for women,” said Douglas W. Laube, MD, MEd, ACOG president. “It leaves no doubt that women’s health in America is perceived as being of little consequence.

“We have seen a steady erosion of women’s reproductive rights in this country. The Supreme Court’s action today, though stunning, in many ways isn’t surprising given the current culture in which scientific knowledge frequently takes a back seat to subjective opinion,” he added.

This decision discounts and disregards the medical consensus that intact D&E is safest and offers significant benefits for women suffering from certain conditions that make the potential complications of non-intact D&E especially dangerous. Moreover, it diminishes the doctor-patient relationship by preventing physicians from using their clinical experience and judgment.

“On behalf of the 51,000 ACOG members who strive to provide the very best possible medical care to the women we serve, I can only hope that in the future, science will again be at the core of decision-making that affects the life and well-being of all of us,” said Dr. Laube.

# # #

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists is the national medical organization representing over 51,000 members who provide health care for women.

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She sent this as part of a comment on a different post, and I asked her if I could reproduce some of that here. She agreed.

What I was most touched by in her comment was that she seemed to be identifying a concern that goes beyond this monumental decision and points to a problem with so much of our approach to social policy as a nation: we seem to be unable, as a country, to act compassionately. She fears that the rhetoric on both sides of this issue miss, sometimes, the concerns of people like her who feel pain at the thought of the loss of an aborted baby and who also feel pain at the fate of unwanted children who are born into situations over which they have no control.

Her comment points to problems that our abortion debates in the US so rarely touch on with the depth they require: that our economic system and political system are not oriented toward being supportive of working families. Our lack of universal health care, of living wages, and of inclusive, family-friendly workplace policies for example, put pregnant women under strains that they should not have to face and cause families to suffer financial hardship and the interpersonal stresses that come from that. Politicized health care policy keeps effective contraception out of the hands of people who need it most resulting in more unwanted pregnancies all while restricting women’s ability to deal with them.

We in the US have become well-socialized into a system that pits against each other groups that actually share many common interests, and does so in a way that a privileged few benefit while the rest of us fight each other. That so many feel so threatened makes it harder for us to feel compassion for one another. And without that compassion it is hard to imagine policies that can ease the conflicts. It is a truly dangerous cycle.

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